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UN’s LOST Treaty debate begins on floor of US Senate tomorrow

In Uncategorized on May 22, 2012 at 1:28 PM

Tomorrow, on the US Senate floor a debate starts that will eventually lead to a vote on the UN’s Law of the Sea Treaty, known internationally as UNCLOS.

As Senators begin their preparation on a vote the UN and Environmentalist await the results. The results of which could have a devastating affect on our economy and our way of life for years to come. If the LOST treaty is ratified this week it will almost be impossible to stop or take away and will squander our nations oil and gas reserve fortunes to many unfriendly countries and deviant regimes.

By essentially giving away our rights to our own seabed to the ISA, a UN International Seabed Authority, we give most of the potential royalties that are “property” of the United States and it’s citizens, worth possibly trillions upon trillions to control of an international body, like the UN.

Redistribution of wealth! The royalties will be passed off to the international UN authorities and dispersed to poorer countries assisting with their poverty, a stated goal of the UN per Agenda 21 and other of it’s many policies.

Environmentalists have said that if the treaty passes and America is able to “tap” into unaccountable unmeasureable “hydrocarbon reserves” thus further degrading our environment with huge carbon loads lawsuits will ensue, further harming our economy and further contributing as a source to spread Americas wealth to the rest of the world against our will. This will only further our economic decline and drastically affect out way of life. Less for us and our economy means less in your pockets.

Our Sovereignty is at stake once again to the UN. No longer can the conspiracy theory negations hold up. We are under attack and if you take a minute to look around you, you will see that the United Nations under the guidance of NGOs (Non Governmental Organizations) via PPPs (Private Partnerships) using our local, State and Federal elected officials to implement and vote in the strategies needed to harm our country and spread the wealth to others instead of to where it belongs and that is in the hands of American Citizens.

President Reagan turned this down 30 years ago and our current sitting president is charging full steam ahead to ratify the LOST treaty thus complimenting his commitment to the concepts of Agenda 21 and the eventual turning over our sovereignty to an international body, the UNITED NATIONS.

Notify your individual US SENATORS TODAY and tomorrow! Please do not hesitate! This is crucial and needs immediate attention! Please do not delay! Please tell them not to ratify the LOST treaty.

Tennessee contacts:

Senator Lamar Alexander

Senator Bob Corker

Source of info:

http://heritageaction.com/stoplost/why-the-law-of-the-sea-treaty-is-still-a-bad-idea/

United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)
• Law of the Sea: UNCLOS—sometimes called the “Law of the Sea Treaty” (or LOST)—established a comprehensive legal regime for navigation and international management of oceanic resources, including the deep seabed.

• President Reagan Refused to Sign: President Ronald Reagan announced that he would not sign UNCLOS shortly after it was adopted in 1982. Reagan stated several objections to it, most of which dealt with its provisions on deep seabed mining. Reagan did, however, support the navigational provisions of UNCLOS, which reflected the customary international law of the sea.

The U.S. Has Much to Lose …
• Another Unaccountable International Bureaucracy: UNCLOS establishes the International Seabed Authority (ISA), a new U.N.-style bureaucracy located in Kingston, Jamaica. As only one of more than 160 countries in the ISA, the U.S. would have limited authority over its decisions regarding the deep seabed. Just like the U.N. General Assembly, proceedings at the ISA would be dominated by anti-U.S. interests.

• Redistribution of U.S. Wealth to the “Developing World”: The U.S. currently enjoys full sovereignty over its entire continental shelf. It can claim all its mineral resources (e.g., oil and gas) and can collect royalty revenue from oil and gas companies for exploitation. If the U.S. joined UNCLOS, Article 82 would require the U.S. to transfer a significant portion of any such royalties to the ISA for “redistribution” to the so-called developing world, including corrupt and despotic regimes.

• Mandatory Dispute Resolution: Under Part XV, the U.S. would be required to engage in mandatory dispute resolution for any claim brought against it by another member of UNCLOS. This may open the U.S. to any number of specious allegations brought by opportunistic nations, including allegations of environmental degradation or polluting the ocean environment with carbon emissions or even from land-based sources.

• U.S. Economic Interests at Risk: UNCLOS claims the deep seabed resources of the oceans as “the common heritage of mankind” and forbids mining unless permission is first received by the ISA, which, of course, takes into account the interests of “developing states” regarding the exploitation of those resources. UNCLOS encourages technology transfers from advanced mining companies to support the mining activities by developing states, which is likely to discourage U.S. companies from participating in such activities.

• The Convention Was Not “Fixed” in 1994: During the early 1990s the deep seabed mining provisions of UNCLOS were renegotiated in the “1994 Agreement.” This addendum to the convention was signed by the Clinton Administration in July 1994. While the 1994 Agreement improved many provisions of the convention, it did not secure “veto” power for the U.S. over the decisions of the ISA.

… and Little to Gain
• Navigation Rights Already Guaranteed: The navigational provisions of UNCLOS reflect long-standing customary international law, under which the U.S. Navy has operated since it was created. The navy has consistently demonstrated its ability to access key strategic straits and archipelagic waters and to protect its high seas freedoms—despite the fact that the U.S. has not ratified UNCLOS.

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